Prevention of mother to child transmission

Mother-to-child transmission of HIV is the spread of HIV from a HIV-contaminated lady to her tyke amid pregnancy, labor (likewise called work and conveyance), or breastfeeding (through breast milk).  Mother-to-child transmission of HIV is also called perinatal transmission of HIV. Mother-to-child transmission is the most widely recognized way that kids end up noticeably tainted with HIV. Mother-to-tyke transmission is the most widely recognized way that kids wind up noticeably tainted with HIV. Pregnant women with HIV receive HIV medicines during pregnancy and childbirth to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. In a few circumstances, a lady with HIV may have a planned cesarean conveyance (now and again called a C-segment) to avert mother-to-kid transmission of HIV amid conveyance. Children destined to ladies with HIV get HIV prescription for 4 to a month and a half after birth. The HIV pharmaceutical lessens the danger of contamination from any HIV that may have entered an infant's body amid labor. Since HIV can be transmitted in bosom drain, ladies with HIV living in the United States ought not breastfeed their infants. In the United States, baby formula is a safe and healthy alternative to breast milk. In the event that a lady takes HIV prescriptions amid pregnancy and labor and her infant gets HIV pharmaceutical for 4 to a month and a half after birth, the danger of transmitting HIV can be brought down to 1% or less.